$0.00 / 0 item(s)
0
0
Categories : History / Theological Resources, STM Series, Tan Jin Huat
Brookes, the British, and Christianity

Product Description

Christian missions working in Sarawak were subjected to the changing emphasis in the aims of the Brooke and colonial governments. The Brooke government had a deliberate policy of using the missions for its political aims. These included a policy of non-proselytisation of the Malays, assigning Christian missions to work in recently pacified areas, and implementing a zoning policy for different Christian missions, that is, segregating them geographically. Though the policy of non-proselytisation of the Malays was intact throughout the successive Brooke regimes, the zoning policy was modified according to the changing socio-political situations of each Brooke Rajah until it finally lapsed during the era of the British colonial government.

Christian missions have been deliberately used to fulfil an economic purpose, such as during Charles Brooke’s era, resulting in the importation of the Foochow Methodists into Sibu. The arrival of the Methodist mission led to the exposure of Sarawak to the outside influence of modernisation. The colonial government had the political aim of using Christianity as a bulwark against communism, but the work of Christian missions went beyond it to affect areas of education, medical and social services, and hence, contributed much to the social transformation of the communities among whom they worked in Sarawak.

ISBN 13:
ISBN 10:
Size:
No. of Pages:
978-983-41281-2-8
983-41281-2-6
210 by 148 mm
104 pages

Additional Information

Weight 0.185 kg

Retail Price : $8.56
[fb_count]

Related Titles

Product Description

Christian missions working in Sarawak were subjected to the changing emphasis in the aims of the Brooke and colonial governments. The Brooke government had a deliberate policy of using the missions for its political aims. These included a policy of non-proselytisation of the Malays, assigning Christian missions to work in recently pacified areas, and implementing a zoning policy for different Christian missions, that is, segregating them geographically. Though the policy of non-proselytisation of the Malays was intact throughout the successive Brooke regimes, the zoning policy was modified according to the changing socio-political situations of each Brooke Rajah until it finally lapsed during the era of the British colonial government.

Christian missions have been deliberately used to fulfil an economic purpose, such as during Charles Brooke’s era, resulting in the importation of the Foochow Methodists into Sibu. The arrival of the Methodist mission led to the exposure of Sarawak to the outside influence of modernisation. The colonial government had the political aim of using Christianity as a bulwark against communism, but the work of Christian missions went beyond it to affect areas of education, medical and social services, and hence, contributed much to the social transformation of the communities among whom they worked in Sarawak.

ISBN 13:
ISBN 10:
Size:
No. of Pages:
978-983-41281-2-8
983-41281-2-6
210 by 148 mm
104 pages

Additional Information

Weight 0.185 kg